Dinoarh Perry for the Forgotten

Dinorah Perry is working diligently to get this show on TV she needs your help!

Dinorah Perry: Crusader for the Real Forgotten – 2010 from Paul Lawrence & Mo Fitzgibbon on Vimeo.

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Stepfather convicted in death of ‘Baby Grace’

He should have been fast tracked to the chair. This child was an innocent and now she will never make her footprint of this earth. These two people had no feeling or love for this preciouse little girl. They threw her away like yesterdays trash.

JUAN A. LOZANO, Associated Press Writer Juan A. Lozano, Associated Press Writer – 1 hr 33 mins ago
GALVESTON, Texas – A Southeast Texas man was convicted Friday of capital murder in the 2007 beating death of his 2-year-old stepdaughter whose battered body was found in a container floating in Galveston Bay.

Jurors deliberated for 4 1/2 hours before finding Royce Clyde Zeigler II guilty in the death of the child known as “Baby Grace.” He will receive an automatic life sentence because prosecutors did not seek the death penalty. Jurors also could have convicted Zeigler of a lesser charge of manslaughter.

Zeigler and his wife, Kimberly Trenor, the toddler’s mother, were accused of killing her during a discipline session that spun out of control. Trenor was convicted of capital murder in February and also received an automatic life sentence.

Investigators called the child “Baby Grace” until relatives in Ohio identified her as Riley Ann Sawyers.

Prosecutors said Zeigler and Trenor killed the toddler at their home in Spring, a suburb north of Houston, during a July 2007 discipline session intended to teach her proper manners. Authorities said Zeigler was upset the 2-year-old didn’t consistently use “please” and “thank you.”

Prosecutors said Trenor and Zeigler beat Riley with belts, dunked her head in a cold bath water and threw her onto a tile floor, fracturing her skull. An autopsy determined the child died of two skull fractures.

After Riley’s death, the couple stuffed her body in a plastic box and hid it for months in a storage shed at their home. Then they drove about 75 miles southeast to Galveston Bay, where they dumped the container and body in October 2007, according to authorities.

Riley’s remains were discovered by a fisherman on a small island in the bay.

During the trial, Ziegler’s attorneys told jurors their client was in another room when Riley died and there was no evidence he killed her.

But prosecutors said Zeigler lied repeatedly to investigators, giving them conflicting statements on the girl’s death. Prosecutors showed the Galveston County jury video of Zeigler admitting dumping the child’s body in the bay.

Riley’s identity was a mystery for weeks until her paternal grandmother in Ohio saw an artist’s sketch of the girl and told authorities in Texas she thought it was her granddaughter.

Trenor and Zeigler met playing an online video game and married in June 2007 after Trenor moved with her daughter from Mentor, Ohio, a suburb of Cleveland, to live with Zeigler in his home in Spring.

Missing Since 1999 Pilar Rodriguez Case has been reopened

PilarInformation from the Charley Project:

This case was reopened this week when the Sheriff’s Office went to the home of Wilson’s Grandmother and searched for evidence by digging in the yard. Someone somewhere knows what happened to this little girl. The baby sitter blames the boyfriend and he blames her.
The question is which one is lying. Keith Allen the boyfriend who was a trucker in 1999 now lives in Kentucky. This child needs to be found so her father can have some closure. If you know anything- please leave a comment on this site and I will see that it gets to the proper authorities. Help us bring this child home.

“Pilar’s father, Marco Rodriguez, was her custodial parent in 1999. He permitted Pilar’s babysitter, Melissa Cooper, to take the child on vacation for two weeks on January 30, 1999. Cooper took Pilar to the Trail Apartments in Punta Gorda, Florida, located approximately 135 miles from the Rodriguez home in Hollywood, Florida. Cooper’s former boyfriend, a truck driver named Keith Allen Wilson, accompanied them.
Marco called the authorities when Cooper and Pilar did not return by February 22, 1999. Cooper and Allen did not have the child, and they initially claimed that Marco had picked her up. Allen also said he had seen evidence that Marco had physically abused Pilar. Police investigated Marco thoroughly but found no evidence that he was involved in his daughter’s disappearance or that he abused her, though he does have a criminal record for battery and driving under the influence. Pilar has never been seen again.

Wilson later changed his story and claimed Cooper, an insulin-dependent diabetic, collapsed in a store and was hospitalized, and when she arrived back at the hotel room she shared with Pilar and Wilson, the child was missing. Cooper denied that any of this had actually happened.

Cooper was located at a her aunt’s home in Wisconsin shortly after Marco filed a report with law enforcement. Cooper claimed that she fled from the vacation home she shared with Pilar and Wilson after her boyfriend became physically abusive towards her and the child. Cooper said that Wilson beat Pilar severely and knocked her head into a wall. She turned blue and had convulsions. He refused to get medical attention for her and she died. He then put her body in a black trash bag and disposed of the child’s remains in an unknown location. Wilson denied Cooper’s allegations and said that she herself was responsible for Pilar’s death. Cooper took a polygraph exam shortly afterwards and passed, according to one source.

Authorities believe that Pilar was the victim of foul play. Officials drained Preacher’s Lake, a popular swimming place in Charlotte County, Florida which is inhabited by alligators, in November 1999 after receiving a tip from fishermen. They found some unspecified biological matter which they believe is a trace of Pilar’s remains. After the discovery, they announced that they were investigating her case as a homicide. Police also found several child-size t-shirts in the lake, including one with a picture of the cartoon character Winnie the Pooh printed on it. Marco says Pilar had such a shirt with her when she left with Cooper. Nothing else of evidentiary value was found in the lake, however. The Peace River in Charlotte County was searched in February 2001, but no evidence was located.

Marco filed a wrongful death lawsuit against Wilson, even though Pilar’s body has never been recovered and no arrests have been made in her case. The suit was dismissed after Marco’s attorney withdrew from the case because of a conflict of interest. Pilar’s mother lives in Ohio; her father was raising her by himself.

Wilson remains the prime suspect in Pilar’s presumed murder; he maintains his innocence. Florida authorities warned law enforcement officials in Kentucky that Marco may have been planning revenge against Wilson after Pilar’s disappearance. Wilson is a resident of Kentucky. Pilar’s case remains unsolved and authorities continue to search for her remains.”

http://www.charleyproject.org/cases/…uez_pilar.html

How Did This Child Disappear out of Her House without Anyone Noticing?

This story is just to bizzare. How did a child that was only seven months old vanish into thin air? She was allegedly asleep in the same room with her parents and vanished between
11:00pm and 3:00AM – The question is how and who?

If she was asleep in her parents room how did they not know someone was in threir house?

resized_Shannon_DedrickA massive search and rescue operation involving several counties in Florida is underway for a missing baby girl. The parents of 7-month-old Shannon Lea Dedrick, of Chipley, FL, reported her missing at 11:23 a.m. on Saturday.

The police say the parents have indicated that the baby was in the same room as the parents, and could have been abducted between the hours of 3 a.m. and 11 a.m.

At least two neighbors are reporting that they saw a grey van near the missing girl’s residence the evening before she went missing. They said it’s the same van they have seen there numerous times over the past couple of months.

Washington County Sheriff Bobby Haddock did say investigators are looking at a “person of suspicion,” but would not elaborate on who that person may be. Whether or not the person is related to the grey van seen at the residence has yet to be determined.

Federal Lawsuit Goes After Clark County Nevada to Protect Children in Foster Care- Judge Denies Suite Why?

I-Team: Federal Lawsuit Goes After County Family Services
Updated: Sep 02, 2009 8:09 PM EDT
Video Gallery
I-Team: Federal Lawsuit Goes After County Family Services
1:54
A California appeals court may help to decide the future of Nevada’s child welfare system. At issue is whether a lawsuit against the state and Clark County should include all foster children.

The National Center for Youth Law, a California-based child advocacy firm, filed the case in 2006 on behalf of all foster children. It alleges kids in the custody of Clark County regularly suffer from physical abuse, a denial of medical and mental health care, and a lack of a permanent home due to the failures of the system that’s supposed to protect them.

“Class certification is important so that absent members of the class, children who in the future come into foster care and those who are now in foster care will be entitled to the protections that we hope to obtain for them through the federal court,” said Bill Grimm with the National Center for Youth Law.

Instead of monetary damages, the lawsuit seeks reform. In court records, Clark County argues reform efforts are underway and have been for several years. They insist many of the lawsuit’s claims are outdated.

The lawsuit names 10 children allegedly harmed by the action, or inaction, of the Clark County Department of Family Services, including one who was scalded to death in a foster home.

The surviving plaintiffs however have either been adopted or aged out of the foster care system so the firm bringing the suit seeks to include all foster kids to make the case a class action.

The Nevada federal judge hearing the suit denied their motion. Now the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals will decide whether he made the right decision.

Efforts to settle the case stalled in recent months. The county says, in part, because the appeals court decision will have a significant impact on the case and whether there are a few plaintiffs or several thousand.

No word on when the court may issue its decision.

Nevada Pays for Lost 2 Year old Child written by Mike Tikkanenon

Nevada Pays for Lost 2 Year Old Foster Child
Published by Mike Tikkanenon June 27, 2009in Crime and Courts, Guardian ad-Litem, Invisible Children, Kids At Risk Action (KARA), Politics and Funding, Public Policy and The States. 0 Comments
Tags: at risk children, dara goldsmith, daughter went missing, exfed investigations, failure to protect, foster child, Guardian ad-Litem, I-team, kara group, lost 2 year old, missing girl case, north las vegas foster home, sued clark county.

With shrinking resources, each state and all counties need to remember the burden placed on county workers & what happens when that burden is excessive. As a long time Hennepin County volunteer guardian ad-Litem, I appreciate the work social workers do to help at risk children and understand the value cared for youth bring to our communities. I also know what happens to children that are not taken care of. This article from the Las Vegas News points out a small part of the cost of failure:

I-Team: Settlement Reached in Missing Girl Case

A settlement has been reached in the civil lawsuit surrounding the disappearance of a 2-year-old foster child. The natural parents of Everlyse Cabrera sued Clark County when their daughter went missing from her North Las Vegas foster home three years ago.

Not long ago, Everlyse’s mom said she wasn’t sure she’d ever settle. Marlena Olivas wanted a trial, she claimed, to expose Clark County’s failure to protect her little girl. But after intense negotiations, the parties reached a $500,000 deal with $250,000 earmarked for Everlyse, should she be found alive on or before her 25th birthday. If she is not, the money is returned to the county.

Some remaining funds will be distributed to her little brother Benjamin, who shared the foster home with Everlyse, and to her biological mom and dad. Benjamin stands to receive $35,000. Her parents get $22,000 each.

The settlement also provides for a scholarship fund in Everlyse’s name, a reward for information about her disappearance, and monies to continue the private investigative effort to find her.

The agreement releases Clark County from any future claims and its employees do not have to admit any wrongdoing. “The most important thing for my perspective is not necessarily a punishment for the county, but to take care of Everlyse. So my concern was not seeing that the county had to turn over the money and had to risk losing that money, but realistically that if Everlyse is found there’s going to be money to provide for her,” said Everlyse’s guardian ad litem Dara Goldsmith.

Before a judge can formally approve the settlement, it must be accepted by the Clark County Commission.

A second battle is brewing over a $200,000 payout from Clark County’s foster parent insurance carrier. Those funds are not part of the negotiated agreement.

Anyone with information about the case, no matter how small, is encouraged to share it with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children at 1-800-THE-LOST or James Conklin with ExFed Investigations at (702) 204-7654.

Michigan Child Welfare System Directly Responsible for Abuse, Neglect, and Death of Foster Children, Says New Expert Report in Reform Lawsuit

Michigan Child Welfare System Directly Responsible for Abuse, Neglect, and Death of Foster Children, Says New Expert Report in Reform Lawsuit

Failures throughout Department of Human Services’ management and investigations of abuse allegations make department “no safer” in many cases than children’s abusive homes

DETROIT, MI Likening the management of Michigan’s Department of Human Services to “blindfolded school bus drivers,” unable to see and respond to impending dangers to the children in its custody, a scathing new report by an expert in Children’s Rights’ child welfare reform lawsuit against the state of Michigan lays the blame for several children’s deaths squarely at the agency’s feet.

The report, issued by an independent consultant with more than 30 years of experience working in child protective services, examines the cases of five children who died in DHS custody—some from extreme physical abuse—and provides a long and detailed list of failures throughout the department’s management and investigations of alleged abuse and neglect in DHS foster care placements that, it says, render DHS incapable of protecting the children in its care.

Today’s report corroborates the findings of another released last week that examined DHS’s management in close detail (characterizing its practices as a “formula for disaster”) as well as findings from a review of 460 individual cases of children in DHS custody—and concludes that DHS has knowingly used misleading calculations to obscure the rate at which children in its custody suffer maltreatment. According to both last week’s case review and today’s report, Michigan’s rate of maltreatment in foster care is two and a half times the standard deemed acceptable by the federal government.

“While the Michigan Department of Human Services has tried to distance itself from the disastrous results of its dangerous practices, children have been dying in its custody and on its watch,” said Sara Bartosz, senior staff attorney for Children’s Rights. “Today’s report reveals the stories behind the statistics, and illustrates in no uncertain terms what is at stake if DHS does not commit to real reform immediately.”

The children whose cases are highlighted in today’s report include:

Elizabeth, whose family became known to DHS after she suffered a brutal physical attack in her home when she was just 14 days old, leaving her with a fractured skull, three fractured ribs, and a fractured clavicle. Elizabeth was made a ward of DHS but was returned to her home, leaving a child placing agency contracted by DHS in charge of monitoring her. This agency failed to forward two reports to DHS with additional evidence of Elizabeth’s abuse—including severe burns and two black eyes—until after Elizabeth was found beaten to death in her home.
Heather, a 15-year-old girl whose serious psychiatric problems went untreated by DHS while she was placed in a filthy, chaotic home with an aunt and uncle unlicensed to provide foster care, where a total of 17 people crowded into a three-bedroom house with only one bathroom. Heather eventually ran away to South Carolina, was abandoned there by DHS, and hanged herself.
Brandon, a seven-week-old boy who was placed in an overcrowded DHS foster home with five other children—three of whom had serious behavioral and mental health problems—and died of apparent suffocation when his foster mother left him unattended.
Isaac, murdered at the age of two in a foster home that had been the subject of nine Child Protective Services (CPS) complaints before his placement there. Less than two months after arriving in the home, Isaac was found beaten to death, covered in burns and bruises and having suffered multiple bone fractures. “An overloaded and apparently incompetent caseworker placed Isaac in dangerous foster homes, failed to visit him regularly, and overlooked evidence of Isaac’s maltreatment,” says the report. “DHS’s actions and inactions, and those of its contractor, caused Isaac’s death.”
James, who died of blunt-force trauma to the head in a DHS foster home just a few months shy of his fourth birthday. Despite the medical examiner’s finding that James’s death was a homicide, DHS’s vague definition of the term “abuse” enabled the agency to conclude in its own investigation that there was not a preponderance of evidence that James had been abused.
The report cites widespread systemic problems throughout DHS that it says created the conditions that contributed to these children’s deaths—and place the 19,000 children currently in DHS custody in similarly grave danger. According to the report:

The structure of DHS is diffuse and inefficient. The department is responsible for a very broad range of services—including Michigan’s welfare, disability assistance, Medicaid, juvenile justice, and child support programs, among many others—but lacks a division devoted specifically to child welfare. Components of the child welfare system are scattered throughout the department, diluting accountability and impeding the communication of critical information. DHS management is structured, says the report, “as if to minimize expert focus on child welfare and to all but preclude the effective protection of its foster children.”
DHS managers lack the education and experience necessary to run a child welfare system. National standards for good practice call for directors of child welfare agencies to hold graduate degrees in human services and demonstrate competence in the delivery of child welfare services. Relevant advanced degrees are the exception among top DHS staff, and few have any child welfare experience at all.
DHS fails to adequately investigate allegations of abuse and neglect in foster care placements. The department’s investigations are unstructured, superficial, and rarely gather sufficient information to determine accurately whether maltreatment has occurred. Furthermore, says the report, DHS investigators “often make determinations that are not consistent with the facts.”
DHS has no quality assurance program and is unable to produce reliable data about its practices and outcomes. The statistical information necessary to guide the operation of the agency at every level—and to identify systemic problems—either does not exist or cannot be trusted. When disturbing data does surface, little is done about it. And the agency calculates some statistics—including its rate of maltreatment in foster care—in a misleading manner that hides the danger to which it subjects the children in its custody.
The report further notes that DHS’s shortage of caseworkers would be enough by itself to preclude the agency from adequately protecting the children in its care—and echoes concerns raised by last week’s case review that the agency places children in unlicensed foster homes with relatives as a means of maintaining a “second class” of placements that receive neither appropriate safety and criminal background checks nor adequate financial support.

“Combining the disturbing deficiencies in MDHS’s performance in the five cases reviewed with the many serious shortcomings found in the agency’s structure, regulation, practices, overall management, and—especially—staff resources, it is clear that children are far too likely to be no safer in foster care than they were with their abusive and neglectful parents,” the report concludes.

Today’s report will be offered as evidence in the federal class action known as Dwayne B. v. Granholm, brought against Michigan by the national child welfare watchdog group Children’s Rights, the international law firm McDermott Will & Emery, and local counsel Kienbaum Opperwall Hardy & Pelton. The lawsuit charges the state with violating the constitutional rights of the approximately 19,000 children in its custody by failing to protect their safety and well-being and find them permanent homes.

Foster Mother Gets Three Years- CPS Gets Zero- Parents Lose Child

Died April 21 2001

This is just to impossible to believe, the foster mother gets three years for killing a child that should have never been taken out of the home- CPS gets zero responsiblity or accountablity and the parents are left with a void that can never be filled. The system is so broken.

Foster Mother Headed To Prison For Boy’s Death

A 63-year-old grandmother who was found guilty of endangering a little boy in her care was sentenced Tuesday for her role in the toddler’s death.

NewsChannel5 reported that Jacqueline Clark will spend three years in prison for involuntary manslaughter in the death of 2-year-old Devin Wilder.

Wilder had been placed in foster care after it was believed that his parents were abusing his little sister, Makenna. It was later determined that Makenna suffers from brittle-bone disease, and that’s what caused so many of her bones to break.

Prosecutors said that Clark’s 15-year-old granddaughter beat and shook Devin to death. The teen was convicted of involuntary manslaughter and is serving time in Devin’s death, but the boy’s parents said that Clark must share some of the responsibility.

“She left Devin with a 15-year-old and she didn’t call 911 until Saturday morning,” said Antoinette Artale, Devin’s mother. “The doctor said that if he had been taken to the hospital Friday night, there was a 50-50 chance he would have made it.”

Clark’s attorney said that the grandmother had no idea Devin was injured until the next morning.

Clark apologized to Devin’s parents in court Tuesday.

“I cannot replace this child, and I cannot again say to the parents how sorry I am,” she said. “I have been in your shoes.”

Clark will be transported to prison within the next week.

The boy’s parents said that the three-year sentence isn’t long enough.

Who is Watching the Watchers – Another Child in Foster Care Dies

Died February 22,2001

Foster mother charged with murdering boy
West Side woman whose foster child died Thursday after being submerged in a tub of freezing water was charged Saturday with first- degree murder.
Police say 29-year-old Flora Stewart punished 6-year-old Allen Kalfus for misbehaving by holding him under a shower of cold water, echoing a similar charge leveled against the mother last year.

Stewart, of the 4300 block of West 19th Street, told police she sent Allen to take a bath and heard him fall after about 45 minutes. Stewart said she found him unconscious in a T-shirt and underwear in the tub with a bump on the back of his head. Police said he also had a first-degree burn under his eye.

A 2-year-old foster child living with Stewart was removed by the Department of Children and Family Services. Two teenage nieces also were living with her.

Last May, Stewart was accused of forcing Allen to take cold showers, said Cook County Public Guardian Patrick Murphy. DCFS investigated the charge, which the boy confirmed but then recanted, and DCFS said it was unfounded, Murphy said.

Two months later, South Central Community Services, the agency that placed the boy, decided Stewart wasn’t cooperating and said the boy should be removed. Stewart filed an appeal, and during mediation, she apologized and promised to try harder. Ultimately, the mediator, Stewart and South Central agreed to leave the child in the home, Murphy said.

Both Murphy and DCFS Director Jess McDonald say the system needs to change.

Foster child’s death ruled homicide

A West Side woman whose foster child died Thursday in a freezing bathtub had been allowed to keep the boy last year after she was cleared of an anonymous accusation that she forced him to take cold showers, officials said Friday.

The freezing death of 6-year-old Allen Kalfus was a homicide, the Cook County medical examiner ruled Friday. Chicago police were still investigating, and no charges had been filed Friday night, said officer Matthew Jackson.

A child welfare official said that last year the foster mother was accused in an anonymous tip of neglecting the boy. The call to the hotline of the Department of Children and Family Services said the foster mother, 30, was forcing Allen to take cold showers after he wet his pants, officials said.

The accusation was investigated and determined to be unfounded. But the agency that had placed the boy in the home recommended that he be removed because the foster mother wasn’t cooperating. After state-required mediation, the private and government agencies agreed to leave him in the home.

Allen Kalfus died of hypothermia Thursday at 4336 W. 19th St. The foster mother had called police, saying she found him unconscious and clothed in the tub.

Another foster child in the home, a boy of 2 or 3 years old, was removed by DCFS on Thursday and placed with another foster parent, said Andy Martinez, a spokesman for DCFS. Two teenagers have been placed with relatives.

Florida CPS Didn’t Report Her Missing for Four Months WHY????

AngelDied December 18, 2006

An error of judgment, a child is lost

Andrea Moore said “It’s clear Florida children are not being protected in our child protection system,”
It took caseworkers four months to report her missing to law enforcement after she disappeared in September.
At the time of Kenia’s death, she and her sister were under protective supervision of the Safe Children

If this had been a parent who hadn’t reported her child missing for four months that parent would have been charged with so many charges they would have never been set free.They called it an error in judgement. That is more than an unfunny joke that is a travesty and criminal. How does CPS get away with this kind of behavior? How can they lose a child and not tell the authorities? How can they not be charged with criminal charges? The system is broken. It is time to make them stop kidnapping and selling our children. They have become the problem not the solution especially when they get federal money for every child they abduct and then adopt out.