The Question is Where are The Children NOW???

Acreage man arrested on child abuse charges; 3-month-old daughter suffers fractured skull, leg, ribs
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By ELIOT KLEINBERG

Palm Beach Post Staff Writer

Wednesday, November 04, 2009

Hipolito J. Fraguela, authorities allege, said his 3-month-old daughter got hurt when a 16-month-old brother threw a can of ravioli at her head.

Then he said she fractured her skull when he dropped her, broke her leg when he stepped on her, and broke her ribs as he gave her CPR.

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Then authorities founded a loaded rifle in his home.

Then he admitted he was part of the Crips gang.

Then he went to jail.

Palm Beach County Sheriff’s deputies arrested Fraguela, 24, of The Acreage, early Friday .

He is charged with two counts each of child abuse with great bodily harm, unsafe storage of a firearm, and possession of a weapon by a felon.

He’s being held in the Palm Beach County Jail in lieu of $82,000 bail.

According to a sheriff’s report, Fraguela and his girlfriend took their little girl Thursday night to St. Mary’s Medical Center, and later to the Joe DiMaggio Children’s Hospital in Hollywood.

Fraguela told investigators that about two weeks earlier, the couple’s 16-month-old son had thrown a can that had struck the baby.

Then, he said, on Oct. 25, the baby’s eyes appeared abnormal and kept crossing, and her arms moved involuntarily.

When the couple took the baby on Thursday to her regular doctor for shots, he examined her and told the parents to take her to the hospital.

There, Hipolito said, doctors told him the child had a skull fracture.

After Hipolito and his girlfriend gave permission for a search of their home, deputies found a loaded .22-caliber rifle on the living room floor.

Hipolito told detectives he had been giving the baby a bath on Oct. 21 and dropped her over his shoulder, and the back of her head struck the floor.

Asked how she got a broken leg, he said that, as he went to pick her up, he stepped on it.

Asked how she got broken ribs, he at first could not say, then said he recalled an incident in which she was choking and he performed cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

On Saturday, a supplement says, doctors at the DiMaggio hospital told detectives they’d found additional injuries; the portion detailing them is whited out.

Hipolito also admitted to being an active member of the Crips, a violent nationwide street gang founded in southern California in the 1970s.

Detectives familiar with the case did not immediately return calls on Wednesday.

According to the sheriff’s report, the Department of Children and Families has told detectives a judge on Friday ordered Hipolito have no contact with his girlfriend or their 16-month-old.

The girlfriend also told detectives she planned to file for a restraining order on Monday, Nov. 2, and court records indicate that took place.

In February 2008, records show, Hipolito pleaded guilty to firing a weapon from a vehicle, a second-degree felony. His sentence was suspended.

Staff writer Michael LaForgia and staff researcher Michelle Quigley contributed to this story

Published in: on November 4, 2009 at 9:39 pm  Comments (3)  
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They Say They Can’t Predict Human Behavior- But Yet they are Smart Enough to Remove Children From Their Home?

Foster mother and 16-year old son charged with felony child abuse

This has to be the most insane piece I have found to date on the reason children are abused in foster homes.The very last sentance is the clincher. DFCS said, they did all the background checks they knew to do, but they can’t predict human behavior. That is indeed an oxymoron. They can predict alleged abuse in a bilogical home but they can’t predict abuse in a foster home. How stupid do they think we are?

Updated: April 16, 2009 01:15 AM EDT

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Foster mother and 16-year old son charged with felony child abuse
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Police arrested a woman and her teenage son Wednesday.

Both are accused of abusing two foster children who lived in their North Las Vegas home.

A judge originally told Child Protective Services to place the children with their biological grandmother. But CPS says they didn’t think that was safe.

So they turned them over to this foster woman who is now charged with four felony counts of child abuse.

“My son, he said he will never forget what happened to him and that hurts my heart,” April Register says.

She’s a mom crying for her children, an eight year old boy and a three month old girl.

Their foster mother 51-year old Deborah Hill and her 16-year old son were arrested and charged with child abuse.

“It was terrible, my god my babies…it was just terrible!” April says while crying.

The children were pulled from their mother, April Register, after the boy swallowed prescription Xanex and had to be hospitalized.

Then after five days in foster care April was taking pictures of her daughter in the hospital. She was dehydrated and had abrasions on her face and leg.

“It was determined through evidence that the injuries these children sustained were consistent with child abuse while they were in her care,” Chrissie Coon, with the North Las Vegas Police says.

Police are offering very few details, but April says her daughter was left face down in a closet for three days.

“That’s how she got the abrasions on her head. My son went to relieve her, because the first night she was there she was put in the closet, and he was beat with a wiffle bat,” April says.

April says Child Protective Services deserves half the blame for not placing her children with their grandmother like the judge ordered.

“This would never have happened had she followed the courts orders,” April says.

Everyone was back in court Monday and the judge ordered the children to be immediately placed with their grandmother. They were and that is where they are now.

A spokesperson with CPS says they still disagree with the judges orders to give the children to the grandmother. They say someone else living in the house did not pass a background check.

As to Deborah Hill, they say they do all the checks they can, but they can’t predict human behavior.

Michigan Child Welfare System Directly Responsible for Abuse, Neglect, and Death of Foster Children, Says New Expert Report in Reform Lawsuit

Michigan Child Welfare System Directly Responsible for Abuse, Neglect, and Death of Foster Children, Says New Expert Report in Reform Lawsuit

Failures throughout Department of Human Services’ management and investigations of abuse allegations make department “no safer” in many cases than children’s abusive homes

DETROIT, MI Likening the management of Michigan’s Department of Human Services to “blindfolded school bus drivers,” unable to see and respond to impending dangers to the children in its custody, a scathing new report by an expert in Children’s Rights’ child welfare reform lawsuit against the state of Michigan lays the blame for several children’s deaths squarely at the agency’s feet.

The report, issued by an independent consultant with more than 30 years of experience working in child protective services, examines the cases of five children who died in DHS custody—some from extreme physical abuse—and provides a long and detailed list of failures throughout the department’s management and investigations of alleged abuse and neglect in DHS foster care placements that, it says, render DHS incapable of protecting the children in its care.

Today’s report corroborates the findings of another released last week that examined DHS’s management in close detail (characterizing its practices as a “formula for disaster”) as well as findings from a review of 460 individual cases of children in DHS custody—and concludes that DHS has knowingly used misleading calculations to obscure the rate at which children in its custody suffer maltreatment. According to both last week’s case review and today’s report, Michigan’s rate of maltreatment in foster care is two and a half times the standard deemed acceptable by the federal government.

“While the Michigan Department of Human Services has tried to distance itself from the disastrous results of its dangerous practices, children have been dying in its custody and on its watch,” said Sara Bartosz, senior staff attorney for Children’s Rights. “Today’s report reveals the stories behind the statistics, and illustrates in no uncertain terms what is at stake if DHS does not commit to real reform immediately.”

The children whose cases are highlighted in today’s report include:

Elizabeth, whose family became known to DHS after she suffered a brutal physical attack in her home when she was just 14 days old, leaving her with a fractured skull, three fractured ribs, and a fractured clavicle. Elizabeth was made a ward of DHS but was returned to her home, leaving a child placing agency contracted by DHS in charge of monitoring her. This agency failed to forward two reports to DHS with additional evidence of Elizabeth’s abuse—including severe burns and two black eyes—until after Elizabeth was found beaten to death in her home.
Heather, a 15-year-old girl whose serious psychiatric problems went untreated by DHS while she was placed in a filthy, chaotic home with an aunt and uncle unlicensed to provide foster care, where a total of 17 people crowded into a three-bedroom house with only one bathroom. Heather eventually ran away to South Carolina, was abandoned there by DHS, and hanged herself.
Brandon, a seven-week-old boy who was placed in an overcrowded DHS foster home with five other children—three of whom had serious behavioral and mental health problems—and died of apparent suffocation when his foster mother left him unattended.
Isaac, murdered at the age of two in a foster home that had been the subject of nine Child Protective Services (CPS) complaints before his placement there. Less than two months after arriving in the home, Isaac was found beaten to death, covered in burns and bruises and having suffered multiple bone fractures. “An overloaded and apparently incompetent caseworker placed Isaac in dangerous foster homes, failed to visit him regularly, and overlooked evidence of Isaac’s maltreatment,” says the report. “DHS’s actions and inactions, and those of its contractor, caused Isaac’s death.”
James, who died of blunt-force trauma to the head in a DHS foster home just a few months shy of his fourth birthday. Despite the medical examiner’s finding that James’s death was a homicide, DHS’s vague definition of the term “abuse” enabled the agency to conclude in its own investigation that there was not a preponderance of evidence that James had been abused.
The report cites widespread systemic problems throughout DHS that it says created the conditions that contributed to these children’s deaths—and place the 19,000 children currently in DHS custody in similarly grave danger. According to the report:

The structure of DHS is diffuse and inefficient. The department is responsible for a very broad range of services—including Michigan’s welfare, disability assistance, Medicaid, juvenile justice, and child support programs, among many others—but lacks a division devoted specifically to child welfare. Components of the child welfare system are scattered throughout the department, diluting accountability and impeding the communication of critical information. DHS management is structured, says the report, “as if to minimize expert focus on child welfare and to all but preclude the effective protection of its foster children.”
DHS managers lack the education and experience necessary to run a child welfare system. National standards for good practice call for directors of child welfare agencies to hold graduate degrees in human services and demonstrate competence in the delivery of child welfare services. Relevant advanced degrees are the exception among top DHS staff, and few have any child welfare experience at all.
DHS fails to adequately investigate allegations of abuse and neglect in foster care placements. The department’s investigations are unstructured, superficial, and rarely gather sufficient information to determine accurately whether maltreatment has occurred. Furthermore, says the report, DHS investigators “often make determinations that are not consistent with the facts.”
DHS has no quality assurance program and is unable to produce reliable data about its practices and outcomes. The statistical information necessary to guide the operation of the agency at every level—and to identify systemic problems—either does not exist or cannot be trusted. When disturbing data does surface, little is done about it. And the agency calculates some statistics—including its rate of maltreatment in foster care—in a misleading manner that hides the danger to which it subjects the children in its custody.
The report further notes that DHS’s shortage of caseworkers would be enough by itself to preclude the agency from adequately protecting the children in its care—and echoes concerns raised by last week’s case review that the agency places children in unlicensed foster homes with relatives as a means of maintaining a “second class” of placements that receive neither appropriate safety and criminal background checks nor adequate financial support.

“Combining the disturbing deficiencies in MDHS’s performance in the five cases reviewed with the many serious shortcomings found in the agency’s structure, regulation, practices, overall management, and—especially—staff resources, it is clear that children are far too likely to be no safer in foster care than they were with their abusive and neglectful parents,” the report concludes.

Today’s report will be offered as evidence in the federal class action known as Dwayne B. v. Granholm, brought against Michigan by the national child welfare watchdog group Children’s Rights, the international law firm McDermott Will & Emery, and local counsel Kienbaum Opperwall Hardy & Pelton. The lawsuit charges the state with violating the constitutional rights of the approximately 19,000 children in its custody by failing to protect their safety and well-being and find them permanent homes.